Dr. Robert Gabbay: May 24, 2021

Keep an Eye on Better Eye Health

MAY IS HEALTHY VISION MONTH

 

Dr. Robert Gabbay – MD, PhD, FACP

Chief Scientific and Medical Officer for the American Diabetes Association (ADA)

                 

 

In celebration of Healthy Vision Month in May, the Focus on Diabetes™ initiative is launching The Next Step Eye Health Challenge to raise awareness of diabetes-related eye disease and the steps people can take to maintain better eye health. Powered by the American Diabetes Association, the campaign focuses on the themes of Education, Empowerment, Execution, and Encouragement.  During the month of May, these helpful resources will be shared along with virtual events and activities.

 

On Wednesday, May 19th Chief Scientific and Medical Officer for the American Diabetes Association, Dr. Robert Gabbay will be available for interviews to elevate the urgency of managing eye health while living with diabetes through story telling.

 

Did you know?

  • Nearly 50% of American adults have diabetes or prediabetes.  Every 21 seconds, someone in the U.S. is diagnosed with diabetes.
  • One in three American adults is at risk for type 2 diabetes.
  • Diabetes affects 30.3 million children and adults in the U.S. today—that’s 1 in 11 Americans.
  • Another 84.1 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and nearly 90% of American adults with prediabetes don’t know they have it.
  • Serious complications of diabetes include blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and amputations.

 

For more information please visit: www.diabetes.org

 

 

MORE ABOUT DR. ROBERT GABBAY:

Robert A. Gabbay, MD, PhD, FACP, is the Chief Scientific and Medical Officer for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the global authority on diabetes. Dr. Gabbay leads the ADA’s efforts to drive discovery within the world of diabetes research, care and prevention.

Dr. Gabbay completed his B.Sc. Degree at McGill University and his PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin where he published on mechanisms of insulin signaling. He then went on to get his medical degree from the State University of New York at Brooklyn School of Medicine with a residency in Internal Medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell and fellowship in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at a joint Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess-Brigham and Women’s Hospital program at Harvard.

 

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